Monday June 23rd, 2014-YFS, Professor Kimberly Carter and the Tar Sands Healing Walk

York Community Report: News Nows Daniel Rostas speaks with Gayle McFadden who is the VP of Campaigns and Advocacy at the York Federation of Students. With Pride Week upon us, Daniel speaks to Gayle about the raising of the flag. In past years, the Rainbow flag has been raised in the York University bus loop. However this year TBLGAY, the LGBT advocacy group on campus, was informed by the York Centre for Human Rights that the flag would not be raised this year. Gayle talks about the situation and what is being done to fight it. For more information on this issue please visit TBLGAY on the Fourth floor of the student center at York University.

Feature Report: News Nows Fakiha Baig speaks with Kimberly Carter who is a Professor at the University of Toronto. They discuss the issue of rape and what makes rape a weapon of war. They also talk about the obstacles that the international community faces in regards to sentencing states and individuals who utilize systematic rape as a tactic of war.

Independent Arts and Culture Report: News Now correspondents Fakiha Baig and Daniel Rostas speak with Jesse Cardinal about the 5th annual Tar Sands Healing walk taking place on Turtle Island starting June 27th, 2014. They discuss what the walk is about, its history and the people who will be participating in the event. To find out more information or to get involved please visit their website http://www.healingwalk.org

Dr. Hedy Fry on addiction and drug policy

Thursday, July 25th edition:

York Connect: News Now reporter Casandra London interviews Michael Stohr, president of Music Africa about their event AfroFest. A community festival that celebrates African music, dance, and culture in Toronto, AfroFest has has what Stohr describes as a “popularity problem.” Find out why the festival had to change it’s location from Queen’s Park to Woodbine Park this year and how “the audience really owns the festival.” [Repeat]

[Image via afrofest.ca]

Feature Interview: In the fifth and final installment of News Now‘s series critically analyzing drug policy, CHRY reporter Matt Prokopiw speaks with Dr. Hedy Fry, Liberal party health critic and MPP for Vancouver Centre. Fry speaks on the importance of harm reduction for public health and how the views around addiction and the victimization of drug users get in the way of effective policy changes in Canada. Find out more about why stigmas within the discourse need to be changed and the efforts being made to combat the misinformation around drugs, drug users, and addiction.

[Image via addictionhotlines.net]

Independent Arts and Culture: News Now contributor Mel Dubé talks to Toronto comedian Keesha Brownie on her accomplishments as a female comic and her growth in the local comedy scene. Hear Brownie talk about how she negotiates being a woman in the industry and how she “showcase[s] different accolades of Keesha Brownie,” depending on her audience. [Repeat]

[Image via facebook.com/keesha.brownie.9]

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Toronto floodings, Rob Boyd on safe injection sites, and youth engagement at Black Creek Community Farm

Thursday, July 18th edition:

York Connect: News Now‘s Rachelle Chau speaks with Professor Christian Abizaid, faculty of Geography & Planning at University of Toronto, about the recent floodings in Toronto. Professor Abizaid discusses the causes of floodings and draws upon his research on the Amazon rainforest to offer ways floods can be avoided or used constructively. Listen to find out the role climate change or human activities had in the spate of floodings across Canada this summer.

[Image via commons.wikimedia.org]

Feature Interview: “People will characterize this as the differences between supervised injection in your community or no injection in your community. That’s not really what the choice is. The choice is between supervised injection in your community or unsupervised injection. And I don’t know why anybody would support unsupervised injection in Toronto.”

In part four of News Now‘s series critically analyzing drug policy, CHRY reporter Matt Prokopiw speaks with Rob Boyd, Oasis program director at the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre in Ottawa. Following recent debates of opening safe injection sites in Toronto, Boyd provides insights into the benefits of supervised injection and how such facilities can help people suffering from addiction and mental illness. Listen to Boyd counter many of the rhetorical arguments made against safe injection sites and talk about the importance of harm reduction policies for public health.

[Image via bc.ctvnews.ca/new-rules-make-it-…tay-open-1.1313821]

Independent Arts and Culture: Philip LiWei Chen, the youth engagement coordinator at Black Creek Community Farm, tells News Now‘s Rachelle Chau how alternative experiential education plays out on the Jane-Finch neighbourhood farm. Chen speaks on the importance of engaging youth and creating networks that promote agriculture leadership among young people in urban areas. Find out about the upcoming cultural initiatives that will be offered at the farm such as martial arts, african drumming, and reclaiming black youth identity through food justice.

[Image via www.facebook.com/BlackCreekCommunityFarm]

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“Indigenous Resistance to Globalization”, Lynne Lyman of Drug Policy Alliance, and AFCY’s BIG BAM BOOM Festival

Thursday, July 11th edition:

York Connect: “Indigenous Resistance to Globalization” is a course offered at York University that explores the current status of indigenous communities around the world and their struggles against exploitation, global capitalism, and neoliberal government policies. News Now‘s Christian Deo and Maggie Reid speak with two students from the course about indigenous resistance in a global context and how students in the class are trying to bring awareness to Six Nations issues by raising funds for an aboriginal youth camp.

[Image via guerrillanews.wordpress.com/2010/01/23/…ack-mesa-az]

Feature Interview: In part three of News Now‘s series critically analyzing drug policy, CHRY reporter Matt Prokopiw speaks with Lynne Lyman, California state director for the Drug Policy Alliance, about the current state of drug policy in the United States. Lyman talks about how current policies that criminalize drug use are based on misinformation and the need for comprehensive drug education that focuses on harm reduction. Learn about why marijuana legalization is such an important measure for the U.S. and how the mix of money and politics has been a roadblock for progressive drug legislation.

[Image via www.facebook.com/drugpolicy]

Independent Arts and Culture: News Now reporter Cassandra London takes us to Arts for Children and Youth‘s fifth annual BIG BAM BOOM festival, showcasing the achievements and talents of youth from Toronto’s priority neighbourhoods. Listen to organizers talk about the event and excerpts from rap, beatboxing, and r&b performances. [Repeat]

[Image via twitter.com/bigbamboomafcy]

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“Bringing Words to Life” with Bruce Beardy, Mark Haden on the “War on Drugs”, and Heart Health with Prof. Tara Haas

Thursday, July 4th edition:

Independent Arts and Culture: News Now‘s Rachelle Chau speaks with Bruce Beardy, co-ordinator of the Native Language Instructors’ Program at Lakehead University, about an article he wrote in the magazine of the Ontario College of Teachers, Professionally Speaking. “Bringing Words to Life” talks about Beardy’s conversations with other indigenous teachers at the Native Language Symposium this past January and how that helped him to become the lead writer for the Teaching Ojibwe and Teaching Oji-Cree Additional Qualification course guidelines. Listen to Beardy speak on the holistic education model found in aboriginal cultures and how it takes into account all parts of life.

[Image via professionallyspeaking.oct.ca/june_2013/…_life.html]

Feature Interview: “What would a society that didn’t criminalize drug use look like?” In part two of News Now‘s series critically analyzing drug policy, CHRY reporter Matt Prokopiw speaks with Mark Haden, a University of British Columbia professor at the School of Population and Public Health. Haden speaks on the failures of the “war on drugs” and why there needs to be “a regulated approach [taken] to current illegal drugs based on public health principles.” Hear how a criminal justice model is not an effective method to combat harmful drug use and how the Netherlands and Portugal have addressed the issues through public health policy.

[Image via www.drugfree.org/join-together/dr…rime-rate-report]

York Connect: From “Pump You Up” on CHRY’s Halftime, Host Randy Reid speaks with Tara Haas, associate professor at the York University School of Kinesiology and Health Science. Listen to Professor Haas talk about how the body and supportive organs respond to and evolve through exercise to positively enhance cardiovascular health.

[Image via nutritionalearth.blogspot.ca/2012/02/in…heart.html]

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